Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Tebow's Drive to Make a Difference

Tim Tebow yearns to make a difference.  Sound a little familiar?

Tebow's Q&A with Rich Cimini on his off the field life in NYC.


Q: What is your proudest accomplishment?
A: Probably the hospital we're building right now [in the Philippines, his birthplace]. Lord willing, it'll continue to help kids long after I'm gone. That's what I want out of everything that my foundation does. I want to help kids when I'm no longer here, when I'm dead and gone. I want to help kids when I don't have the energy and the time to help them, but somehow still find a way to make a difference. This hospital is one example of that.

Q: You were 7 years old when you were diagnosed with dyslexia. What message would you want to convey to someone who just found out they're dyslexic?
A: One of the first things I'd say is, it has nothing to do with how intelligent you are. You can be extremely bright and still have dyslexia. You just have to understand how you learn and how you process information. When you know that, you can overcome a lot of the obstacles that come with dyslexia. When you figure out how you learn, you can accomplish whatever you want.

Q: Do you remember the first time you asked someone for an autograph?
A: My dad took me and my brothers down to a Florida Fan Appreciation Day. We waited in line and got a bunch of the guys' autographs, but my favorite one was Fred Taylor. We wanted to get Danny Wuerffel's autograph, but we didn't want to wait in line that long. It was actually pretty cool because, a few weeks later, he ended up coming to our church. I was 8 and I got his autograph that day. What was cool about that was, I got it on a church bulletin and I still have that framed in my parents' house in Florida.

Q: What about the first time you signed an autograph?
A: I was 15 years old, and we got done playing a game. Someone came up to me and handed me a baseball and said, "Would you please sign this baseball because I think you have a chance to become something someday?" It was after a football game, but I signed a baseball. It's so funny because I can honestly say I wasn't one of those kids that practiced his signature, so I thought, "How am I going to do this?" My brother and his friends were all laughing. They all said, "That's the worst signature I've ever seen."

Full Q&A here.